United States

Energy drinks, also called functional drinks, have been accumulating space in the hallway of drinks from grocery stores for some time. Popular among adolescents, college students, athletes, and for those with long, hard days, these charged liquids with caffeine have been made with large capital. Used alone, energy drinks provide a boost of energy during the day (and night) and used judiciously is healthy for the adult audience. But for adolescents, and people with certain medical conditions, the combination of these drinks with alcohol is another thing, nothing advisable. A report published in February in the journal Pediatrics online, noted that almost half of 5.448 cases of overdose of caffeine in the United States.UU.

reported in 2007 occurred among people younger than 19 years old. And certain health problems, particularly in children, such as diabetes, disorders of mood, or heart, kidney and liver diseases may be affected negatively by the large amount of caffeine in beverages. There are also some ingredients that can interfere with medicines, such as those adopted for hyperactivity disorder attention deficit and antidepressants. The key is moderation with alcohol, and adding an energy drink, moderation is pulled through the door, to a certain extent.